Year: 2014

Impromtu Table Setting at Grandma’s House

  My grandmother is an unbelievable hoarder. I know that’s very typical of most women (and most grandmothers) who find use for even the oldest and most dilapidated can or bottle in the house. My grandmother never throws things away, and it’s impossible to start a conversation with her on purging. Purging is not in her dictionary. Often times though, my grandma’s being a hoarder is put to good use, especially when it comes to impromptu events when we need to set her table for guests — even if it’s just family.  Advertisements

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Small Town Diaries: Before Sunrise

With dawn, there is the promise of a beautiful sunrise and a new day. But, unfortunately, before the new day is the unfathomable darkness and a painful good-bye to yesterday. Such was/is my life in the past weeks. I welcome the mornings these days, especially the opportunity to move on to life. I would be dishonest when I say I don’t fear what tomorrow will bring, but alongside fear, is my excitement over happy and better things the new dawn brings to me and my family.

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Cebu Farmers Market

Today was a busy day for me. I had to wake up early to do my cousin’s make-up for her graduation from college, I had to prepare lasagna as my contribution to the graduation part, and attend a highschool classmate’s wedding. In between these activities, I had to squeeze in time this morning to check out Cebu Farmers Market. 

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How to Spruce Up A Rental with Cheap Frames

Living in a rental is great for a lot of practical reasons, but could also be limited and limiting. I love my tiny apartment and it’s location, and while it doesn’t bother me that much, sometimes I feel constricted because my landlady prohibits attaching nails to walls. I am one to abide rules so I had to make do when it comes to decorating my “she-cave” using frames that were meant to be hanged. Because I could not afford art works (yet), I made do with what I think is art that I found from inexpensive sources.

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Taste of the South (Cebu) While in a Bus

The past two months, I’ve been traveling back and forth between Cebu and my home province of Siquijor, and one of the few modes of transportation is through a land-trip by a bus via the coastal road in southeastern Cebu. Each province, town, or city in the Philippines has a delicacy, a specialty food that usually is unique to that place — and southeastern Cebu is no different.

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Small Town Diaries: The Modern Gypsies

For as long as I can remember, these what I call modern gypsies have been a permanent fixture in our small town’s fiesta celebration every summer. Five to 10 days before the fiesta and five to 10 days after, they occupy a substantial amount of real estate in town where they set up temporary tents and display their goods all day. Most of these gypsies are traders — selling everything from magic wallets to household wares.

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Poppy Coffee & Cupcakes, Dumaguete

When my boyfriend and I went home to Siquijor last November, on the way back to Cebu, we took a fastcraft to Dumaguete and from there decided to take a midnight boat to Cebu. When I’m too hungry to think of where to eat in Dumaguete, I don’t go adventurous and check out the newest places. Instead, I walk a hundred meters or so from the port to Jo’s Chicken Inato and order a piece of chicken and rice (and pancit canton if I’m not on a budget or in a hurry). And that’s exactly what my boyfriend and I did. After our dinner at Jo’s, we walked around the downtown of Dumaguete, checked out their plaza (and it was filled with people that day being a Sunday and a few days before their fiesta), and tried to find somewhere we can sit and have coffee and sweet treats. We noticed a few new coffee shops in the area but finally settled with Poppy at the Siliman Portal because it was deserted.

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Joed’s Lutong Hapon

I am not a fan of Japanese food — at least the raw ones. I can’t even bear to eat kinilaw or ceviche even if it’s made by my father and from the freshest catch of the day. But there was once a time when all I was craving for were tempura and donburis, and I was on the search for affordable and local eateries. Joed’s was popular in my online search, although I never got to try it until this year. I have no idea how authentic Japanese food tastes like, but I enjoyed the food that I ate at this restaurant — because it was affordable, it was cooked properly, it was beef, and I was hungry.

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