All posts tagged: “featured”

A Freelancer’s Guide to DIY Income Tax Return (ITR) Filing

** This is updated as of April 7, 2017. I am now in the process of filling up my Income Tax Return. I know, kinda last minute, especially that April 15 (the day for filing tax returns) falls on a Holy Week. I am home-based (work-at-home, freelance) writer and researcher, and I wanted to share some things I learned while doing my tax returns. Advertisements

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Souvenirs from Chiang Mai

Chiang Mai is a highly cultural city. Everywhere I went, there was a celebration of Lanna arts, crafts, and culture. I found shopping in Chiang Mai to be a delight. There were malls, sure, but what I found more amazing is how the city made it very easy for tourists to access local arts, crafts, and food that, as a true blue Pinoy, can bring home as pasalubong (souvenirs).

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From Poppy to Coffee — Trek at Thailand’s Highest Mountains

Aek pointed out something on the ground. “Look at that. Do you know why the people of Thailand love the King so much? Because of that,” he said. I tried to understand what he was trying to say because the road was narrow and muddy. It was not until we got to a clearing and saw the length of the humble irrigation system that ran the whole side of the mountain we just trekked. This is why I came to Thailand. I may not have met the King. But I witnessed how he changed the lives of his people, through irrigation, through agriculture.

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Doi Suthep — Wat You Can’t Miss in Chiang Mai

“Where do you stay?,” the Destination Chiang Mai agent asked us. “Behind Wat Mo Kham Tuang,” along Sri Poom Road.” He scratched his head. “Is that the wat with many horses?” I said, “No. It’s the wat with glitters on its front wall.” He got more confused. Everybody in the office now joined us as we plotted where Wat Mo Kham Tuang is. “Ah, there are just too many wats here in Chiang Mai.”

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Chiang Mai Eats — Cafes to Streets

Eating out in Chiang Mai was easier compared to Bangkok because Chiang Mai was a smaller city. In fact, we just have to walk 10 meters and we could get papaya salad made fresh by our neighbor in his home-turned-restaurant-at-night. Beside his house, another neighbor sells banana and vegetable fritters. In Chiang Mai, you walk just a distance of five meters and another restaurant, diner, or stall selling food will greet you. Here are my top recommendations.

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Ola Lavanderia Cafe, Melaka

The last meal we ate in Melaka was breakfast, and we went to Ola Lavanderia Cafe. It was a logical choice because it was located just across our guesthouse, and it was the only eatery open at 8AM. We were in love with Melaka and we thought we would cap our “love at first sight” in this very nice cafe with very handsome owner.

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Afternoon Tea at The Manila Hotel

I woke up at half past 3 in the afternoon in Manila. I was refreshed and the pain in my eye that has been bugging me the past four days is now gone. We arrived in the capital 12 hours before, hit the welcoming pillows of the quaint Casa Bocobo Hotel at 4AM, visited a government agency for a scheduled appointment, had lunch at a Chinese restaurant, and went home to get some much-needed shut eye. I was glad it was still half past 3. That means we still have enough day light to cover at least one museum, the whole length of Rizal Park, and still be on time for an afternoon tea.

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